Archive for the 'Videos' Category

Norwegian Photographer Terje Sorgjerd’s New Time Lapse Video: The Arctic Light

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Videos

My Father’s Garden by Mirko Faienza

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Videos

Spiney caterpillar with rose pollen on spines

Click here to see some National Geographic Pollen Grain photos

Frans Lanting – A Personal Journey

This entry is part 5 of 4 in the series Videos

Earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris)

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If I were an early bird, this plump little fellow would look like a tasty morcel to me! What one might call a good start to the day. I’m sure there’s a moral to be learnt here somewhere.

Ahh, yes, of course :

The early bird gets the worm.

We all know that the world belongs to those who get up nice and early. Get up early and life can but smile for you.

However, there is a darker side to this story… one of personal disaster… the early (perhaps even earlier) worm gets eaten! Of course we automatically associate ourselves with the bird. The moralists of old conveniently failed to complete their comforting proverb. It should read :

The early bird gets the worm.
But the early worm gets eaten!

In other words know yourself! If you are a bird, get up early. If you are a worm, stay in bed a little longer and let other worms get eaten!

And, for the mice amongst us, here is some food for thought :

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Wikipedia entry on the earthworm

Watch “Darwin’s Worm” a short video made by Jean Painlevé on the virtues of the earthworm.

Two-tailed Pasha (Charaxes jasius)

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When on the wing, this large and powerful butterfly resembles more a small bird than a butterfly due the speed and the nature of its flight. This no doubt serves it well since it has the habit of establishing and defending hilltop territories otherwise known as “hilltoping” (hilltops serve as mate-encounter sites not only for this species but also for many other insects).

Ideally, I would have liked to photograph it with its wings open, but when it did eventually decide to land (several times on animal dung), it immediately placed its wings in an upright position. This was the best shot I could get – naturally I avoided to photograph it on dung!

Charaxes jasius’ larval foodplant is the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) but it is also attracted to fermenting fruit, animal dung, and alcohol in the form of beer and wine!

Now watch a short educational film (in French) on the life-cycle of Charaxes jasius.

Other resources :